Soil surveys and their application in tropical agriculture

J.K. Coulter

Abstract


In a recent paper on soil surveys Kellogg (1962) stated ‘I am persuaded that the failure of the British Groundnut Scheme in East Africa did more to get soil surveys accelerated in that continent than anything else’. Undoubtedly there is now a greater appreciation of the value of soil surveys for developing countries and the provision of aerial photographs and improved maps has made surveying quicker and more accurate. On the other hand greatly increased funds from national and international agencies and the fact that soil surveys have become fashionable have led to a much greater interest in this type of work. Soil surveys have the added attraction to aid-giving agencies of having a beginning and an end and the end—the brightly coloured soil maps—can be exhibited as a measure of achievement.


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